October 3, 2018

Presenters:
Kent Calder, Vice Dean for Faculty Affairs and International Research Cooperation, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Dr. Margret Wintermantel, President, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)
Michelle Müntefering, Minister of State, German Foreign Office

Panel:
John-Michael Arnold, Post-Doctoral Fellow, "The United States, Europe, and World Order" Project, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Thomas Erndl, Deputy Speaker, Subcommittee for Foreign Cultural and Educational Policy, Member of the German Bundestag
Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Elias Götz, Post-Doctoral Fellow, "The United States, Europe, and World Order" Project at the Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Stephan Kieninger, Post-Doctoral Fellow, "The United States, Europe, and World Order" Project at the Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Kristina Spohr, the inaugural Helmut Schmidt Distinguished Professor, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Moderated by Daniel S. Hamilton, Austrian Marshall Plan Foundation Professor and Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS

To mark the celebration of German Unity Day, Johns Hopkins SAIS and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) kicked off their partnership initiative: a new, multi-year program featuring the Helmut Schmidt Distinguished Professor and a new post-doctoral program in the field of international relations and history.

The university hosted a panel featuring members of the program to address the shift in the relationship dynamics between the United States and Europe.

The event commenced with an introduction to the new program by DAAD President Margret Wintermantel, whose generous support helped launch the initiative. This was followed by an address on current issues by Germany’s Deputy Foreign Minister, which then led into a discussion on the current state of world order and contemporary issues facing the US and Europe.

Stephan Kieninger discussed the US’s current cooperative security policies, largely in part to the Reagan administration’s shift away from a conservative angle in the aftermath of the Cold War to help the US adjust to normality. He noted that economics served as a catalyst for these efforts and continue to be an important aspect of the transatlantic entity.

Daniel Hamilton stated that US interests were always involved in the European world order, and questioned whether European interests remain a priority in the minds of American leaders under the Trump administration.

In response, Francis Gavin expressed that the US-Europe relationship continues to be extremely critical, but one that is taken for granted. He acknowledged that the two global players have consistently triumphed challenges together, and highlighted the deep resilient ties between the two as a result of these successes.

In contrast, Kristina Spohr was concerned with the diverging direction of the two powers. She urged the need to make collective changes that will allow unity in thought and value. She specifically called on the Arctic Council, stating that collaborative efforts in combating climate change will bond Europeans and Americans for a common good. Thomas Erndl expressed similar points, speaking about the changing political environment and how it has re-shaped US-European diplomatic relations.

The panelists concluded the discussion by answering questions from the audience about their thoughts on the American democratic approach to European affairs and Helmut Schmidt’s successes in maintaining relations with the US and the Soviet Union during the aftermath of the Cold War.

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