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ENGAGING WORLD LEADERS, GROUNDBREAKING INSIGHTS


The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) hosts many special events providing students, faculty, alumni, and guests opportunities to hear a wide spectrum of viewpoints on the issues that shape our world. 'The Recap' captures important events across our three campuses.

Please visit regularly for summaries, videos, and photos of our world-class events.

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ENGAGING WORLD LEADERS, GROUNDBREAKING INSIGHTS


The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) hosts many special events providing students, faculty, alumni, and guests opportunities to hear a wide spectrum of viewpoints on the issues that shape our world. 'The Recap' captures important events across our three campuses.

Please visit regularly for summaries, videos, and photos of our world-class events.

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Culture Change at the State Department


Inclusive Government Leaders Share Their Insights

Culture Change at the State Department


Inclusive Government Leaders Share Their Insights

Lora Berg ’84, Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and Senior Foreign Service Officer (ret.)
Betty Bernstein, Senior Advisor and Director of Operations of the Office of Global Women’s Issues, US Department of State
Jesse Bernstein,
Senior Advisor, Office of Multilateral and Global Affairs, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, US Department of State
Zakiya Carr Johnson, Director of Race, Ethnicity, and Social Inclusion Unit, Policy Planning and Coordination Office of Western Hemisphere Affairs, US Department of State
Mischa Thompson, Policy Advisor for the U.S. Helsinki Commission

Presider, Kent Davis-Packard, Adjunct Professor of Middle East Studies and American Foreign Policy

March 6, 2017

Co-sponsored by SAIS Women Lead and the Global Theory and History Program, the second Inclusive Diplomacy Luncheon Seminars gathered current US Department of State representatives to discuss the work of advancing inclusive policies and agendas.

Betty Bernstein discussed her role in integrating gender issues throughout the work of the Department of State. Bernstein stressed that the issue of gender is the key for national prosperity and stability, and is thus being considered as a national security priority. She stated that researches have indicated a closed gender gap will bring a $28 trillion GDP growth by 2025.

Jesse Bernstein discussed the department's efforts to advance human rights for LGBTI persons. He emphasized a strategy to increase the visibility of the LGBTI community among governments and with allies in the faith and private sectors. Bernstein suggested that despite increasing awareness, enacting LGBTI inclusive policies remains an ongoing process.

Zakiya Carr Johnson shared about her work on the department's Race, Ethnicity, and Social Inclusion Unit. Carr Johnson is working on bilateral agreements like the U.S.-Brazil Joint Action Plan to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Discrimination and Promote Equity. She stated that discussion of inclusive issues has begun to transition from a conceptual framework to technical operations and programming. Carr Johnson emphasized the need to consider the existence of multiple layers of discrimination on a given individual when structuring policy and strategy.

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A Conversation With Ambassador Deborah Jones


A Conversation With Ambassador Deborah Jones


Ambassador Deborah Jones, former US Ambassador to Kuwait (2008-2011) and Libya (2013-2015)

March 6, 2017   

As the former American envoy to Libya, Ambassador Deborah Jones visited the school's Washington, DC campus to discuss insights and perspective gained during her service in Libya and Kuwait.

Jones shared that the 2011 Arab Spring uprising built momentum for change in Libya by questioning the legitimacy of the Gaddafi government, noting that technology and social media became disruptive forces harnessed by the movement, an effective bottom-up revolution. Jones assessed that Libyan society was highly fragmented in part due to geographical and historical reasons, giving rise to Gaddafi's rule as he exploited and reinforced these challenges during his nearly 40-year reign. Today, Libya's lack of civil institutions continues to contribute to the fluid and speculative political environment, Jones said.

This engaging discussion with students, faculty, and alumni and moderated by Dean Vali Nasr, also touched on the future of Syrian conflict negotiations and Jones' experience building political consensus through outreach to civil groups.

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SAIS' Got Talent


SAIS' Got Talent


March 4, 2017

Organized by the Student Government Association (SGA), the 2017 SAIS' Got Talent variety show featured nine contestants eager to impress the student community. The contest began with the first round of open-ended questions related to international relations and current politics. In the second section, each contestant performed their unique talent.

Dennis Hong started with a tranquil Chopin nocturne on a keyboard piano, followed by Rachel Xian’s two love songs. Representing the Bologna students, Pelayo Gonzalez brought three songs with guitar accompaniment to the stage. Patrick Xiong impressed the audience with his wide vocal range by singing Vitas’ Opera 2. Chloe Colbert used her lyrical dance routine to captivate the energetic audience. Aniket Maitra, a true stand-up comedian, brought streams of laughter to the audience. As a music lover, Helen Ma performed a tune from Broadway favorite Hamilton with a wish that nobody will throw away their shot. Emmett Potts wowed the crowd with a spectacular O Sole Mio. Finally, the only MIEF contestant, Marco Kim pushed the evening to a new high with his K-Pop dance.

After the audience cast their votes, the winner of this year’s SAIS' Got Talent went to Pelayo Gonzalez and Marco Kim won second place. 

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Negotiation Opportunities and the Challenges Ahead


Negotiation Opportunities and the Challenges Ahead


Ambassador Thomas Pickering, Vice Chairman, Hills & Company
Ambassador Princeton Lyman, Senior Adviser to the President, U.S. Institute of Peace
Galia Golan, Darwin Professor emerita, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Vali Nasr, Dean, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies
Moderated by I. William Zartman, Jacob Blaustein Distinguished Professor Emeritus of International Organization and Conflict Resolution

February 27, 2017

Renowned experts in international relations gathered for a panel discussion of major topics they say will factor into diplomatic negotiations in the next year. These issues include: regression of nuclear weapons, Ukraine, China and the South China Sea, avoiding the destruction of European integration, conflict in Syria, and conflict in Yemen.

Ambassador Princeton Lyman concentrated on the occurrence of past conflicts that still exist today. Additionally, Lyman said technological developments are taking away some of the traditional pathways out of poverty, stressing the need for new economic paradigms.

Galia Golan centered on past negotiations regarding Israel and Palestine and the lessons we can draw from them. Golan claimed that many of the issues in these negotiations stemmed from mutual mistrust and devious leaders who had no intention of following through with the negotiations.

Johns Hopkins SAIS Dean Vali Nasr spoke about the context in which the resolution of conflicts have taken place or are expected to have shifted. He also drew attention to the current vacuum in Washington and the opportunities that creates to drive things forward with less resistance.

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The Challenge of Security and Development in Africa


The Challenge of Security and Development in Africa


Vice Admiral Michael T. Franken, Deputy Commander for Military Operations, US Africa Command (AFRICOM)

February 27, 2017

The Africa Studies program hosted a discussion on the Washington, DC campus with Vice Admiral Michael Franken of the US Africa Command (AFRICOM). Franken gave an overview of the challenges inherent in US policy towards the continent. He emphasized the need to develop educational opportunities, support infrastructure investment, expand transportation networks, and better utilize power sources to bolster growth in Africa. Franken also underscored the future geopolitical and economic importance of Africa as well as promising trends in its recent evolution.

Africa continues to face many issues, Franken said, including mass migration, violent extremist organizations, trafficking networks, and corrupt governance that often hamstring prospects for further development. Franken shared about the ways AFRICOM relies on cooperating with a broad swath of host nations, allies, partners, and multinational bodies in order to combat the security related dimensions of these problems. Franken concluded by stressing that AFRICOM will continue to focus on containing and defeating militant groups Al-Shabaab, ISIL, and Boko Haram, on stemming illicit trafficking activities, developing capacities, and providing humanitarian disaster relief to achieve these objectives.

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Black History Month 2017 at Johns Hopkins SAIS


Black History Month 2017 at Johns Hopkins SAIS


February 2017

Johns Hopkins SAIS celebrated Black History Month 2017 with a series of events exploring African American contributions to history, culture, and economic policymaking. 

On February 3rd, Roger W. Ferguson, Jr, President and CEO of TIAA, spoke with students and alumni about his positive outlook on the U.S. economy. Ferguson then addressed the pressing economic challenges for the new U.S. administration and concluded by offering lessons learned through his leadership in boardroom diversity efforts.

On February 10th, the school organized a visit to two exhibits at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, “In the Groove” and “Harlem Heroes,” showcasing iconic images of 20th century jazz artists and photographic portraits of central figures in the Harlem Renaissance. After touring the exhibits, participants learned more about the artists and themes of their work in a talk with Walter Evans, noted collector of African American art and artifacts.

On February 13th, the school's diversity committee hosted a dinner and screening of the movie “Selma,” a chronicle of the tumultuous three-month period in 1965, when Martin Luther King, Jr. led a dangerous campaign to secure equal voting rights in the face of violent opposition.

On February 14th, a panel of experts discussed the current and future trend of policies addressing racial equality in educational and labor market outcomes. William M. Rodgers III of Rutgers University argued that the larger black-white wage gap today is not only a result of black-specific features in the economy, but also of the general economic trends. Cornel University's Michael Lovenheim discussed the quality-fit tradeoff embedded within the affirmative action policy in the realm of higher education admissions.

On February 24th, Chiedo Nwankor, Visiting Research Associate and Adjunct Lecturer, assessed the existing state of gender relations from a lens of ‘intersectionality’ of Hilary Clinton, Beyoncé, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Nwankor asserted that race, gender, and culture are forces that interact dynamically to create institutions that reinforce gender norms.

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The Point of Intersection


Hillary Clinton, Beyonce, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

The Point of Intersection


Hillary Clinton, Beyonce, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chiedo Nwankor, Visiting Research Associate and Adjunct Lecturer
Moderated by Noemi Crespo Rice, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs

February 24, 2017

As part of the school's observance of Black History Month 2017, Chiedo Nwankor assessed the existing state of gender relations from a lens of ‘intersectionality.’

Nwankor asserted that race, gender, and culture are forces that interact dynamically to create institutions that reinforce gender norms. For example, on the question of how Beyoncé represents feminism, she maintained that Beyoncé has become the new face of black feminism and that her success is a symbol of liberation.

In evaluating Hillary Clinton’s performance in the recent US presidential elections, Nwankor stated that Clinton failed to win the support of the millennials and women of color because she embodied the life of a typical white female. Her democratic rival Bernie Sanders, on the other hand, represented an ideal which appealed to the masses across demographic lines in the context of slowing economic growth and dissatisfaction with existing systems.

Questions from the audience touched on Nwankor's work helping underprivileged African women, the impact of sex-positivism on feminism, and on whether Hillary Clinton’s marriage influenced her image as a presidential candidate.

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Lessons from the Last Mile: Reflections on a Career Shaped by the Peace Corps


With Carrie Hessler-Radelet, former director of the Peace Corps

Lessons from the Last Mile: Reflections on a Career Shaped by the Peace Corps


With Carrie Hessler-Radelet, former director of the Peace Corps

Carrie Hessler-Radelet, Former Director of the Peace Corps

February 15, 2017

Carrie Hessler-Radelet was the 19th Director of the Peace Corps, serving from June 2014 to January 2017, and is a member of a four-generation Peace Corps family. Hessler-Radelet spoke of the revolutionary idea behind the Peace Corps. When President Kennedy signed the executive order creating it, many found the concept bizarre. The fundamental belief underlying the Peace Corps was that peace can only come through profound understanding and appreciation of others' cultures.

Hessler-Radelet was a Peace Corps volunteer herself, serving for two years in Samoa. She spoke passionately about her host mother, Losa, whose life was saved by a local midwife who convinced her to deliver her ninth child at a local clinic. Hessler-Radelet sees her experience as a Peace Corps volunteer as the start of her career in public health.

Finally, she shared three challenges with the audience. The first: to take courage and fight actively for our beliefs. The second: to cultivate "strange bedfellows"—supportive relationships with people who do not share our beliefs. The third: to "be the change we wish to see in the world."

Questions from the audience touched on a wide range of issues including reforms the agency undertook under her leadership and the future of the international development field.

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Race, Education, and the Labor Market


Where Do We Go From Here?

Race, Education, and the Labor Market


Where Do We Go From Here?

A William M. Rodgers III, Professor of Public Policy and chief economist at the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University
Michael Lovenheim, Associate Professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornel University
Moderators: 
Rodney Andrews, Harvard University Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar, Assistant Professor of economics at University of Texas, Dallas
Mine Z. Senses, Associate Professor of International Economics at Johns Hopkins SAIS

February 14th, 2017

Policies designed to tackle racial disparities in higher education and labor market outcomes have been controversial. As part of Black History Month at Johns Hopkins SAIS, experts recently gathered to discuss the current and future direction of such policies that can promote equal opportunities for all.  

"Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.” Opening with an excerpt from Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream’ speech, William Rodgers argued that the larger black-white wage gap today is not only due to changes that affect only African Americans in the economy, but also of the general economic trends, such as the decline in the manufacturing sector. Wage difference should thus not only be viewed as a problem of racial injustice, but also as a social injustice for all Americans. He proposed that policy should combine both race-neutral and race-specific approaches.  

“Affirmative action is not a binary policy; it is about the extent it covers.” Michael Lovenheim discussed the quality-fit trade off embedded within the affirmative policy in the realm of higher education admissions. He contended while the quality of a given institution positively affects underrepresented minority students’ post-graduation earnings, the mismatching of the students’ academic preparation for the given institution due to admission preference may counter-balance the positive quality effect. Lovenheim suggested policy makers focus on determining a suitable level of affirmative action policies, and urged universities and colleges to invest in programs, such as tutoring, that support academic success among students’ affected by the policy.

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A Conversation on Asia's Economic Challenges


A Conversation on Asia's Economic Challenges


Frederic Neumann '00, PhD '05, Co-Head Of Asian Economic Research and Managing Director, Global Research, The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited (HSBC)

Moderated by John Lipsky, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute and Peter G. Peterson Distinguished Scholar, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs

February 13, 2017

Frederic Neumann took on the imposing task of analyzing challenges facing Asia today and deliberating over its future prospects. Neumann described the present situation as a balancing act involving delicate and difficult choices in the midst of miscellaneous pressures.

The discussion started with a brief history of how the West and the East have gotten where they are today; the former stagnating and the latter soaring. He attributed the troubles in the West as the fallout of the 2008 financial crisis, and said Asia's strong growth is due to the region’s ability to push up leverage and offset slow demand from the West. Neumann argued that the problem with debt-driven growth is that it is not sustainable and the region must pursue export-led growth to restore the balance. Yet the demographic trends, growing labor costs, surging protectionism and changing consumption patterns all slow trade and suggest a new reality for Asia, he contended. Most of the factors that drive these bleak prospects are structural and there is no quick medicine for solving them. Neumann argued that the answer to regional problems lies in raising productivity growth, which means that hard domestic choices await. 

Questions from the audience covered a broad range of topics, including China’s dwindling forex reserves, demonetization in India, deflation in Japan, and innovation in China.

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Who's Coming to the Embassy Tonight?


Diversity and Inclusion in Foreign Policy

Who's Coming to the Embassy Tonight?


Diversity and Inclusion in Foreign Policy

Lora Berg '84, Senior Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States and Senior Foreign Service Officer (ret.)
Laurie S. Fulton, Chair of Global Engagement for Meridian Board of Trustees and former US Ambassador to Denmark
Minjon Tholen, Diversity and Inclusion Strategist with Cook Ross
Mischa Thompson, Policy Advisor for the U.S. Helsinki Commission
Presider, Kent Davis-Packard, Adjunct Professor of Middle East Studies and American Foreign Policy

February 13, 2017

SAIS Women Lead and the Global Theory and History program co-hosted a roundtable luncheon with foreign affairs experts on implementing diversity and inclusion measures.

Minjon Tholen explained how a rapidly changing marketplace and workforce are creating a strong business case for diversity and inclusion. To illustrate the meaning behind the terms, Tholen said "diversity is being invited to the party, and inclusion is being asked to dance."

Mischa Thompson shared a case study for establishing diversity and inclusion as organizational priorities. She advocated for a bill passed by the US Congress in December which directs the Department of State to track and report its efforts to recruit a more diverse staff.

Ambassador Laurie Fulton illustrated that inclusion is not always easy, even in Denmark—a worldwide model for tolerance. "Traditional Danes" are increasingly under pressure to reconcile their aspirations for tolerance with the fact that immigrants have struggled to achieve integration in Danish society. Working with local officials in many neighborhoods and towns outside the urban capital, Fulton brought immigrants and traditional Danes together to celebrate their common ground and the richness of what unites them as human beings and as Danes.

Drawing from her career in the Foreign Service, Lora Berg shared examples of different countries and their relationships to diversity and inclusion. To explain that awareness is not enough, Berg led an exercise helping participants to develop a personal diversity mission statement.

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New Challenges for the Refugee Regime


New Challenges for the Refugee Regime


Anne C. Richard, Former Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees, and Migration
Michel Gabaudan, President, Refugees International
Ruth Wedgwood, Edward B. Burling Professor of International Law and Diplomacy
Moderated by Maureen White, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute

February 7, 2017

Experts gathered at the Washington, DC campus for a discussion on the consequences of President Trump’s executive order, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” The order suspends the US refugee admission program, severely restricts entry from seven majority-Muslim countries, and bars all Syrian refugees from entering the country indefinitely.

Michel Gabaudan said that the order risks conflating victims with perpetrators by associating refugees with terrorists. He also reminded the audience that the situation in the United States is completely different from that in Europe. Refugees who were able to enter the US were all vetted before arrival, while those in Europe are evaluated once they are already on European soil.

Anne Richard talked about the previous administration’s efforts to show leadership on the issue of refugees. She also noted that while many have called for “extreme vetting,” it is unclear what this means. Maureen White pointed out that vetting for refugees is already very thorough. It currently involves eight federal agencies, six security databases, five background checks, four biometrics security checks, three separate in-person interviews and two inter-agency security checks.

Ruth Wedgwood argued against the flawed notion that 'if the US does not welcome refugees someone else will.' In the case of refugees, the United States' identity as the indispensable nation holds true, Wedgwood said.

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A Conversation With TIAA CEO Roger W. Ferguson, Jr


A Conversation With TIAA CEO Roger W. Ferguson, Jr


Roger W. Ferguson, Jr, President and CEO of TIAA
Moderated by John Lipsky, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute and Peter G. Peterson Distinguished Scholar, Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs

February 3, 2017

The outlook for the American economy continues to be bright and improving in the near term, according to Roger Ferguson of financial services giant, TIAA. The consensus view among economists is for sustained growth globally, although at a slower rate than recent expansions, Ferguson reported.    

Asked by moderator John Lipsky to comment on the most pressing economic challenges for the new US administration, Ferguson said these issues include boosting growth, managing tax cuts and reforms, infrastructure building, and controlling inflation. Regarding the effectiveness of post-2008 financial sector reforms, including Dodd-Frank regulations, Ferguson acknowledged that capital in the banking sector has increased and that a drive has emerged toward stronger management culture. However, he added that the slow progress of rebuilding public trust in financial markets is still troublesome.

On the challenge of ensuring financial security in retirement, Ferguson said the major roadblocks include the issues of poor enrollment rates in retirement programs, low savings among Americans, and the changing expectations for retirement age. Ferguson concluded by offering lessons learned through his leadership in boardroom diversity efforts, tying the event into the school's celebration of Black History Month 2017.

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The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force


The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force


Hal Brands, Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs
Eliot A. Cohen, Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies
Ambassador Eric Edelman, Practitioner in Residence at Johns Hopkins SAIS and former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
Moderater: Thomas Mahnken, Senior Research Professor at Johns Hopkins SAIS and President and CEO of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments 

February 3, 2017

The Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies hosted a discussion and book signing with author Eliot Cohen on his new release, The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force. Cohen explained that hard power remains essential for American foreign policy, while acknowledging that the United States must be careful about why, when, and how it uses force. Panelists discussed how military power, even as only a silent threat and not in action, is key to effective diplomacy. The strategic importance of the United States’ alliances was a point of emphasis for the panelists, who expressed concern that America's commitment to these alliances is being questioned.

In the question and answer portion, Cohen explained that his book was completed before the 2016 US elections roiled our national politics. In light of growing populist and anti-globalist movements in the US and abroad, he shared updated analysis on the challenges of using military might and soft power to sustain the global order. 

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By Speaker


By Speaker


Paul Achleitner, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Deutsche Bank AG

Priya Agrawal, Executive Director, Merck for Mothers

Masood Ahmed, Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund

Montek Singh Ahluwalia, former Deputy Chairman of India’s Planning Commission

Madeleine Albright, former U.S. Secretary of State (Hopkins-Nanjing Center Convocation, June 18, 2016 and Rethinking Regional Security, October 22, 2015)

Samuel Alito, Jr., Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

General John Rutherford Allen, former Commander of the NATO International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces in Afghanistan; former Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL

Bertrand Badré, Managing Director and CFO of the World Bank Group

Ambassador Barbara Barrett, Chairman of the Aerospace Corporation

Daniel Barnett, MD, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Priya Basu, Manager, Development Finance, The World Bank

Don Beyer, U.S. Representative for Virginia's 8th District

Bill Bishop, Writer, The Sinocism China Newsletter

Maria Elena Boschi, Italian Minister of Constitutional Reform and Relations with Parliament

John Brennan, Director, Central Intelligence Agency

Tina Brown, Founder and CEO of Tina Brown Media

William J. Burns, President of Carnegie Endowment

Dennis Carroll, Director, Global Health Security and Development, Bureau for Global Health, USAID

Amy Celico, Principal, Albright, Stonebridge Group

Martin Cerisola, Assistant Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund

Nadereh Chamlou, International Development Advisor

Ling Chen, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Derek Chollet, Senior Advisor for Security and Defense Policy at The German Marshall Fund of the United States and former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs

David Chun, Founder and CEO of Equilar

Janine Austin Clayton, M.D., Associate Director for Research on Women’s Health, National Institutes of Health

Celeste Connors, Associate Practitioner in Residence, Energy, Resources, and Environment Program

H.E. Jose L. Cuisia, Philippine Ambassador to the U.S.

Nikhil da Victoria Lobo, Senior Vice President, Head Global Partnerships Americas, Swiss Re

Uri Dadush, Senior Associate and Director of the International Economics Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center, Rabat Morocco

Ronald J. Daniels, President of The Johns Hopkins University

Chen Deming, President of the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits and former Minister of Commerce for the People's Republic of China

Roger Diwan, Vice President, IHS Financial Services

David Dollar, Senior Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution

Ambassador Eric Edelman, Roger Hertog Distinguished Practitioner-in-Residence, Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations

Gady Epstein, Media Editor at The Economist

Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University

Mitsuhiro Furusawa, Deputy Managing Director, IMF

Adam Garfinkle, Editor, The American Interest

Michel Gabaudan, President of Refugees International

Jeremy Goldkorn, Founder and Director of Danwei

Peter Grauer, Chairman of Bloomberg LP

Stephen Hadley, former National Security Advisor

Penda Hair, Co-Founder and Co-Director, The Advancement Project

Birgit Hansl, Lead Economist and Program Leader for the Russian Federation at the World Bank

General Michael Hayden, former Director of the NSA

Davida Herzl, CEO of Aclima

Carla Hills, Chairman and CEO, Hills and Company

Aasim M. Husain, Deputy Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund

Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law, Harvard University Law School

Kenneth M. Jacobs, CEO of Lazard

Chen Jun, President of Nanjing University

Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, former US Ambassador to Afghanistan and to Iraq, former US Permanent Representative to the United Nations

Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow of the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs

Edward Knight, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Nasdaq

Senator Menno Knip, Chair, Sub-Committee on Transatlantic Economic Relations

Monica Kowal, Vice Chair of the Ontario Securities Commission

Pravin Krishna, Chung Ju Yung Distinguished Professor of International Economics and Business

David M. Lampton, George and Sadie Hyman Professor and Director of China Studies, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Nicholas Lardy, Anthony M. Solomon Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics

William P. Lauder, Executive Chairman of Estée Lauder Companies

Philippe Lazzarini, Deputy United Nations Special Coordinator for Lebanon

Roger Leeds, Senior Research Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Richard Lugar, former Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Michael Lynton, CEO Sony Entertainment, Chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment

Suzanne Maloney, Senior Fellow Center for Middle East Policy and Energy Security and Climate Initiative, The Brookings Institution

Michael Mandelbaum, Christian A. Herter Professor and Director of American Foreign Policy, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Catherine L. Mann, OECD Chief Economist

James McIntire, Washington State Treasurer

Liu Mingkang, Distinguished Research Fellow at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Former Chairman, China Banking Regulatory Commission

Laxman Narasimhan, CEO of Pepsico Latin America

 

Susan Ness, Conference Chair and Senior Fellow, Center for Transatlantic Relations

Rachel Notley, Premier of Alberta

Ambassador Lana Nusseibeh, United Arab Emirates Permanent Representative to the United Nations

Evan Osnos, Staff Writer for The New Yorker

Ambassador Anne W. Patterson, Assistant Secretary of State for Near East Affairs

Richard Plepler, Chairman and CEO of HBO

Kenneth Pollack, Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Trudy Rubin, Foreign Affairs Columnist, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Paolo Scaroni, Deputy Chairman of the Rothschild Group

Jacquelyn Serwer, Chief Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Jean-Francois Seznec, Scholar, Middle East Institute and Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Ambassador Wendy R. Sherman, former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2016 Commencement speaker)

Adam Sieminski, Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration

Randa Slim, Director for Track II Initiatives at the Middle East Institute and Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Martin Sommer, Deputy Chief, Middle East and Central Asia Regional Studies Division, International Monetary Fund

Brande Stellings, Vice President of Corporate Board Services of Catalyst

Steve Strongin, Head of Global Investment Research, Goldman Sachs

Lawrence Summers, Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus at Harvard University

Reka Szemerkenyi, Ambassador of Hungary

Hung Tran, Executive Managing Director, Institute of International Finance

Tiger Tyagarajan, President and CEO of Genpact

James White, Former (retired) Chairman and CEO of Jamba Juice

Gita Wirjawan, Chairman of Ancora Group and former Republic of Indonesia Minister of Trade

Peter Wittig, Ambassador of Germany

Shahid Yusuf, Chief Economist, International Growth Center, and Johns Hopkins SAIS Adjunct Professor

Min Zhu, Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund