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ENGAGING WORLD LEADERS, GROUNDBREAKING INSIGHTS


The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) hosts many special events providing students, faculty, alumni, and guests opportunities to hear a wide spectrum of viewpoints on the issues that shape our world. 'The Recap' captures important events across our three campuses.

Please visit regularly for summaries, videos, and photos of our world-class events.

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ENGAGING WORLD LEADERS, GROUNDBREAKING INSIGHTS


The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) hosts many special events providing students, faculty, alumni, and guests opportunities to hear a wide spectrum of viewpoints on the issues that shape our world. 'The Recap' captures important events across our three campuses.

Please visit regularly for summaries, videos, and photos of our world-class events.

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2016 Climate Transactions Summit


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2016 Climate Transactions Summit


Martin O'Malley, former governor, Maryland
Mogens Lykketoft, president, UN General Assembly
Mafalda Duarte, CEO, Climate Investment Funds
Kenneth Lay, managing director, Rock Creek Capital, former Treasurer, the World Bank
John Lipsky, senior fellow, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

May 31-June 1, 2016

Global leaders in infrastructure finance convened at the World Bank for a two-day summit to share best practices on scaling up climate-smart investment. Johns Hopkins SAIS students Sara Eisemann, Jeff Gibson, Jason McConnell, and Brandon Yeh teamed up with Professor Irving Mintzer and visiting scholars Amber Leonard and Marjorie Tsang to organize the event, which drew 88 industry professionals from 20 countries and five continents.

Panelists agreed that the best way to overcome critical market failures and fill the trillion dollar annual investment gap is to de-risk, aggregate, and securitize the financing for sustainable infrastructure projects. Participants presented successful examples of climate-smart investments that are replicable, scalable, and applicable in multiple geographies. Among others, the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) and Latin American development banks (IADB, CAF) presented successful examples of innovative financing for roof-top solar systems in India, energy-efficient street lighting in Colombia, and large-scale, grid-connected solar in South Africa.

Participants stressed that developing standardized legal contracts and shared performance metrics are essential for dramatically expanding the pipeline of investable projects – and key to accelerating the rate of project origination and to scaling up successful investment models. They highlighted that declining costs of renewable energy systems and energy-efficiency technologies are creating many new investment opportunities. Discussions focused on how to “crowd-in” more private capital across the climate investment landscape.

Many of the Summit participants reported that the Summit created a unique opportunity to bridge across the traditional communities within the financial services sector ecosystem and to catalyze new coalitions of interest.

The Climate Transactions Summit (CTS) will become an annual event. Contact Professor Irving Mintzer for additional information. 

 

Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley at the 2016 Climate Transactions Summit: “Carbon will be priced. It’s a matter of when and where…Climate change is the greatest business opportunity to come to the United States in 100 years.”

Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley at the 2016 Climate Transactions Summit: “Carbon will be priced. It’s a matter of when and where…Climate change is the greatest business opportunity to come to the United States in 100 years.”

 

 

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EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2016


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EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2016


Adam Sieminski, Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration

June 28, 2016

The United States is making progress toward energy independence, driven by booming production of shale natural gas which is projected to rise 50 percent by 2040, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2016. EIA Administrator Adam Sieminski previewed the soon-to-be-released report at a presentation hosted by the Johns Hopkins SAIS Energy, Resources and Environment program and the Bernard Schwartz Forum on Constructive Capitalism.

The Annual Energy Outlook report analyzes industry trends and makes long term projections on energy supply, demand, and prices. Sieminski shared his key takeaways in the 2016 data, most notably that the U.S. will become a net exporter of natural gas by mid-2017.

Acknowledging the complexity of predicting oil prices, Sieminski said the 2016 report projects even lower oil prices of $25 to $80 per barrel for the next year. Increasing domestic oil production combined with higher fuel efficiency is expected to drive down imports from 24 percent of supply in 2015 to 19 percent of supply by 2040, Sieminski said.  

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Responding to Lebanon's Syrian Refugee Crisis


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Responding to Lebanon's Syrian Refugee Crisis


Philippe Lazzarini, Deputy United Nations Special Coordinator for Lebanon

Moderated by Randa Slim, Director for Track II Initiatives at the Middle East Institute and Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS

June 24, 2016

The international community must do more to support Lebanon as it struggles with a large influx of Syrian refugees, according to Philippe Lazzarini of the United Nations. Refugees now account for a staggering one-third of the population in Lebanon, and the resulting economic stress represents a threat to stability in Lebanon and the region. Lazzarini pointed to the country's sluggish economy which has left many Lebanese citizens jobless and anxious about their future. Lazzarini implored the international community to extend financial and institutional support to Lebanon with a broad focus on stabilization, peace and security, and combating pre-existing institutional weakness.

Addressing questions from the audience, Lazzarini commented on the need to scale adequate education and employment opportunities and offered his predictions for Lebanon in the near future. He stressed the need for comprehensive international and domestic strategies to address security, infrastructure, and strengthening of its public institutions. Furthermore, he advocated that in order for policymakers to ensure lasting and useful solutions they must look beyond a mere political solution in Syria, and assume that the refugees will be in Lebanon for the long term.

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The Hopkins-Nanjing Center's 30th Anniversary Celebration


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The Hopkins-Nanjing Center's 30th Anniversary Celebration


Madeleine Albright, principal, Albright Stonebridge Group and former U.S. Secretary of State
Ronald J. Daniels, president of The Johns Hopkins University
Chen Deming, president of the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits and former Minister of Commerce for the People's Republic of China
Chen Jun, president of Nanjing University
Vali Nasr, dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

June 17-19, 2016

"No one was better than Confucius at defining a win-win proposition," said former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright '63 at a convocation address marking the 30th anniversary of The Hopkins-Nanjing Center (HNC), "and that is precisely the kind of partnership that the United States and China should continue building."

The U.S.-China relationship has significantly changed over the three decades since the HNC first opened its doors in 1986 and became China’s first academic partnership with a western university. Today, the HNC continues to serve as a model of what the two nations can achieve through a shared commitment to free and open academic exploration. “Though the world may be different,” Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels said, “the values on which the center was founded – academic rigor, scholarly freedom, and cultural exchange – remain as vital as ever.”  

Special events hosted over the anniversary weekend included a tea ceremony and discussion by Secretary Albright, a forum on U.S.-China relations, a foreign policy toolkit presentation by Secretary Albright, a traditional folk music performance by Nanjing University musicians, a gala dinner, and commencement recognizing the 175 members of the HNC Class of 2016.

HNC alumnus and former Chinese Minister of Commerce Chen Deming '88 cited recent positive developments between the two nations, including the Joint Statement on Climate Change announced by President Xi Jinping and President Obama prior to the 2015 Paris Climate Conference, and the upcoming inclusion of China's currency in the special drawing rights of the International Monetary Fund. Chen credited his experiences at the HNC with broadening his horizons and deepening his understanding of market economics.

Looking back at the role of academic and cultural exploration in strengthening the U.S.-China ties, Secretary Albright said that "What the Hopkins-Nanjing Center has achieved affirms my belief that the most important institutions are those that contribute to international education," Albright continued, "few institutions have been, and will be, as important as the Hopkins-Nanjing Center.”

See event photos on flickrPhotos courtesy of Carl McLarty. 

For alumni anniversary greetings and more information about The Hopkins-Nanjing Center, watch HNC Life Begins At 30 or visit the HNC web page

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Learning to Live With Cheaper Oil


Policy Adjustment in Middle Eastern and Central Asian Oil Exporting Countries

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Learning to Live With Cheaper Oil


Policy Adjustment in Middle Eastern and Central Asian Oil Exporting Countries

Min Zhu, Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
Martin Sommer, Deputy Chief, Middle East and Central Asia Regional Studies Division, International Monetary Fund
Roger Diwan, Vice President, IHS Financial Services
Aasim M. Husain, Deputy Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund
Vali Nasr, Dean, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Jean-Francois Seznec, Scholar, Middle East Institute and Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Moderator: John Lipsky, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS

June 8, 2016

Experts from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) convened at Johns Hopkins SAIS to release a report and discuss the effects of declining oil prices in the Middle East and Central Asia during an event co-hosted by the Middle East Institute.

IMF Deputy Managing Director Min Zhu explained factors driving recent oil prices, including rising shale production, slowing growth in emerging markets, and a greater emphasis on fuel efficiency and environmental sustainability. He supported a comprehensive approach to reduce oil revenue dependence in the Middle East and Central Asia.

Martin Sommer, Deputy Chief of the Middle East and Central Asia Regional Studies Division at the IMF, noted the strategies used by countries in the Middle East and Central Asia to respond to the current oil price decline. He warned that the uneven distribution of savings, rising debt, and lack of private sector jobs may create a large deficit and slow growth if their governments do not implement long term reforms soon.

Panelists also discussed supply and demand dynamics in energy markets, oil price projections, and the need for greater diversification in the regions' economies. 

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Celebrating the Class of 2016


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Celebrating the Class of 2016


Commencement

May 19, 2016

The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) celebrated its 72nd commencement with the Class of 2016 on May 19.

Dean Vali Nasr commended graduates, hailing from 50 different countries, for their hard work and leadership in global issues. He asked the graduates to “remember to help each other,” noting “The world is more complex, more interconnected, and more vulnerable to traditional challenges than ever before. Tackling these complex global challenges will require intellect and commitment, but also collaboration, strong relationships, and empathy."

Ambassador Wendy Sherman, former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and lead U.S. negotiator for the Iran nuclear deal delivered the keynote address and advised graduates to take risks in their professional and personal lives. Sherman noted her career shift from idealistic social worker to diplomat negotiating a nuclear nonproliferation agreement as an example of how unpredictable—yet meaningful—life can be.  

Graduates Elizabeth Knowles Parker-Magyar and Jenna Spinks were presented with the Christian A. Herter Award for outstanding academic achievement, and Lorena Americano Valente and Sheimaliz Glover received the William C. Foster Award for distinguished service to the school. The Max M. Fisher Prize for Excellence in Teaching was presented to International Economics associate practitioner-in-residence Mark White.

A commencement ceremony was held at SAIS Europe on May 14 with 27 students graduating in the MA, MAIA and MIPP programs. The ceremony featured a keynote address from alumna Christina Balis, Principal of Avascent Europe. Professor Mark Gilbert was awarded the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Award.

For full coverage of the 2016 Commencement, visit the event video, photo album, and social media summary.

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A Roundtable Discussion with NATO Parliamentarians


Security Challenges

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A Roundtable Discussion with NATO Parliamentarians


Security Challenges

Christopher Chivvis, Adjunct Professor of European Studies, Johns Hopkins SAIS and Associate Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center, RAND Corporation
Vali Nasr, Dean, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Senator Menno Knip, Chair, Sub-Committee on Transatlantic Economic Relations

May 9, 2016

A group of 35 NATO member parliamentarians representing 15 countries met at the Washington campus May 9 for a special roundtable discussion about emerging security challenges that face the alliance.

Adjunct Professor of European Studies Christopher Chivvis provided an overview of the shifting threats to NATO security that are redefining the role of the world's most powerful military alliance, including new threats gathering around NATO's "southern flank" of the Middle East and North Africa. Chivvis described the challenges in the region that make it more difficult for NATO engagement and answered questions from parliamentarians on how the alliance can play a constructive role in the Middle East and North Africa.

Dean Vali Nasr outlined U.S.-Iran relations and the importance of diplomacy at a time when Iran remains the single most important country currently out-in-the-cold in terms of the global order. Nasr noted that the recent nuclear deal between the U.S., Iran and other signatories has the potential to become a major diplomatic achievement as the first time in history a country subject to U.N. section 7 sanctions may come out of that status without going to war. Nasr explained how the Iran deal is being received in the U.S. as well as within Iran, and pointed to the deal as a pivotal development which is changing geopolitical strategy and is driving the United States' perspective in the region.

Video available at https://youtu.be/ZB5Hr7NS9xg.

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Russia's Long Journey to Economic Recovery


The World Bank's New Russia Economic Report

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Russia's Long Journey to Economic Recovery


The World Bank's New Russia Economic Report

Birgit Hansl, Lead Economist and Program Leader for the Russian Federation at the World Bank

May 6, 2016

The Russian economy was hit hard in 2015 by a dramatic drop in the price of oil—the country's chief export commodity—and by sanctions imposed against the nation by the United States and the European Union resulting from the annexation of Crimea. During an event outlining the World Bank's latest report on the Russian economy, Birgit Hansl acknowledged that the road to recovery will be lengthy and difficult.        

Double-digit inflation and real wage stagnation has led to decreases in household consumption and lack of investment. The result has been six consecutive quarters of recession in Russia. One bright spot in the data was the Central Bank of Russia's policy response to the recession, which was to free float the currency, allowing the ruble to devalue in order to reduce the harshest effects of the downturn.

Hansl concluded by pinpointing areas of concern for Russia and why there will be little potential growth in the short and medium terms. These concerns include too much reliance on oil exports, lack of economic policy options as foreign reserves run short and fiscal expenditures run too deep, financial instability, and investment constraints.

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What Policies Could Normalize Markets?


Launching the IMF's April 2016 Global Financial Stability Report

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What Policies Could Normalize Markets?


Launching the IMF's April 2016 Global Financial Stability Report

José Viñals, Financial Counselor and Director of the Monetary and Capital Markets Department at the IMF
Douglas Elliott, Partner at Oliver Wyman

May 3, 2016

Risks to global financial stability have risen over the last six months, according to the latest release of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Global Financial Stability Report. The report, a semi-annual publication overseen by José Viñals, has become "a benchmark publication and one that anyone interested in analysis of global financial markets has to read," according to John Lipsky, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute.

During the May 3 event Viñals touched upon significant and worrisome trends in the global economy. In particular that global GDP has seen some recovery, but has still not reached the robust levels of the pre-financial crisis era. Viñals also noted that corporate earnings per share in advanced economies have been on the decline, emerging markets have had increasing debt levels, and concerns have been raised over these economies not earning enough to continue making interest payments.

Douglas Elliott of international management consulting firm Oliver Wyman shared concerns over the prolonged expansionary monetary policies around the world and the impact on frivolous risk taking within financial sectors. Viñals and Elliott offered some suggestions for improvement, using the example of the Banking Union in Europe as a step in the right direction. They also pointed out that monetary policies still have influence and their benefits still outweigh the costs, but that these policies must be coupled with structural reforms to maximize benefits.

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A Conversation with Lana Nusseibeh


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A Conversation with Lana Nusseibeh


Ambassador Lana Nusseibeh, United Arab Emirates Permanent Representative to the United Nations

May 2, 2016

Ambassador Lana Nusseibeh visited the Washington campus to discuss the importance of women's rights, youth empowerment and extremism, and the UAE's regional priorities at the UN.

With half of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) population under age 25, Ambassador Nusseibeh said that youth empowerment is a critical focus of the region’s efforts to combat violent extremism. Extremist groups such as the Islamic State should be countered in the digital domain by the use of social media, which has served as a major source of youth recruitment.

Ambassador Nusseibeh also spoke at length concerning regional security issues like the conflicts in Syria, Yemen, and Libya and the UAE's approach to find peaceful resolutions, ongoing dialogue, and the cessation of funding to proxy groups that contribute to regional instability. She concluded with her thoughts on the upcoming election for Secretary-General of the UN, saying that the most successful leader will place a premium on reforms to improve the UN's mission and efficacy.

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Philippines 2016: Governance, Growth, Development, and Security


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Philippines 2016: Governance, Growth, Development, and Security


H.E. Jose L. Cuisia, Philippine Ambassador to the U.S.
The Honorable Richard Lugar, former Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations


April 28, 2016

Thirty years after the 'People Power Revolution' transitioned the Philippines to a democratic government, how has the nation progressed in improving the lives of its residents? A group of Johns Hopkins SAIS students partnered with the Embassy of the Philippines and the U.S.-Philippines Society to reflect on the nation's accomplishments and continuing challenges in economic development, security, and governance at a panel discussion at SAIS Washington.

The keynote address by Philippine Ambassador to the United States Jose L. Cuisia examined his country’s recent security priorities, including territorial disputes over the South China Sea, provocative actions by North Korea, and an increasing threat of expansion of ISIS in Southeast Asia.

Panelists from the World Bank, U.S. Agency for International Development, Millennium Challenge Corporation, U.S.-Philippines Society, National War College, University of Hawaii, and Johns Hopkins SAIS continued with analysis of economic trends, development strategies for growth, and U.S.-Philippine cooperative security arrangements.   

Closing remarks were shared by former Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Richard Lugar, who offered his perspective as the American official tasked with observing the 1986 presidential election and supporting the Philippine government's transition from authoritarian regime to democratic republic. 

Videos

Part 1: Keynote by Ambassador Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. and panel on Governance, Growth, and Development

 

Part 2: Peace and Security panel, closing address by Sen. Richard Lugar

 
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Alberta Premier Rachel Notley at the 2016 Enders Lecture


Annual Thomas O. Enders Memorial Lecture on U.S.-Canadian Relations

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Alberta Premier Rachel Notley at the 2016 Enders Lecture


Annual Thomas O. Enders Memorial Lecture on U.S.-Canadian Relations

2016 Thomas O. Enders Memorial Lecture on U.S.-Canadian Relations
The Honorable Rachel Notley, Premier of Alberta
Moderated by Bob Perciasepe, President of the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

April 28, 2016

The Center for Canadian Studies partnered with the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions to host Alberta Premier Rachel Notley for the 2015-2016 Thomas O. Enders Memorial Lecture on U.S.-Canadian Relations. The event was hosted at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.

In her first official visit to Washington as premier, Notley discussed Alberta’s climate and energy policies, as well as outlined opportunities for the province to collaborate with the United States. She discussed how Alberta seeks to become more innovative in fueling its economy, while being more environmentally conscious – such as phasing out coal emissions by 2030 and embracing renewable resources like wind and solar energy.

The Thomas O. Enders Memorial Lecture is named for the diplomat who served as U. S. Ambassador to Canada for presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter. Enders held other important posts during his career including Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs, Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs, and U.S. Ambassador to Spain. The annual lecture on U.S.-Canadian relations with a focus on economic issues is sponsored by the Thomas and Gaetana Enders Foundation.

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By Speaker


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By Speaker


Paul Achleitner, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Deutsche Bank AG

Priya Agrawal, Executive Director, Merck for Mothers

Masood Ahmed, Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund

Montek Singh Ahluwalia, former Deputy Chairman of India’s Planning Commission

Madeleine Albright, former U.S. Secretary of State (Hopkins-Nanjing Center Convocation, June 18, 2016 and Rethinking Regional Security, October 22, 2015)

General John Rutherford Allen, former Commander of the NATO International Security Assistance Force and U.S. Forces in Afghanistan; former Special Presidential Envoy for the Global Coalition to Counter ISIL

Bertrand Badré, Managing Director and CFO of the World Bank Group

Ambassador Barbara Barrett, Chairman of the Aerospace Corporation

Daniel Barnett, MD, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Priya Basu, Manager, Development Finance, The World Bank

Bill Bishop, Writer, The Sinocism China Newsletter

Maria Elena Boschi, Italian Minister of Constitutional Reform and Relations with Parliament

John Brennan, Director, Central Intelligence Agency

William J. Burns, President of Carnegie Endowment

Dennis Carroll, Director, Global Health Security and Development, Bureau for Global Health, USAID

Amy Celico, Principal, Albright, Stonebridge Group

Martin Cerisola, Assistant Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund

Nadereh Chamlou, International Development Advisor

Ling Chen, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Janine Austin Clayton, M.D., Associate Director for Research on Women’s Health, National Institutes of Health

Celeste Connors, Associate Practitioner in Residence, Energy, Resources, and Environment Program

H.E. Jose L. Cuisia, Philippine Ambassador to the U.S.

Nikhil da Victoria Lobo, Senior Vice President, Head Global Partnerships Americas, Swiss Re

Uri Dadush, Senior Associate and Director of the International Economics Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and Senior Fellow, OCP Policy Center, Rabat Morocco

Ronald J. Daniels, President of The Johns Hopkins University

Chen Deming, President of the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits and former Minister of Commerce for the People's Republic of China

Roger Diwan, Vice President, IHS Financial Services

David Dollar, Senior Fellow, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution

Ambassador Eric Edelman, Roger Hertog Distinguished Practitioner-in-Residence, Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations

Gady Epstein, Media Editor at The Economist

Niall Ferguson, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History, Harvard University

Mitsuhiro Furusawa, Deputy Managing Director, IMF

Adam Garfinkle, Editor, The American Interest

Michel Gabaudan, President of Refugees International

Jeremy Goldkorn, Founder and Director of Danwei

Stephen Hadley, former National Security Advisor

Penda Hair, Co-Founder and Co-Director, The Advancement Project

Birgit Hansl, Lead Economist and Program Leader for the Russian Federation at the World Bank

General Michael Hayden, former Director of the NSA

Carla Hills, Chairman and CEO, Hills and Company

Aasim M. Husain, Deputy Director, Middle East and Central Asia Department, International Monetary Fund

Lani Guinier, Bennett Boskey Professor of Law, Harvard University Law School

Kenneth M. Jacobs, CEO of Lazard

Chen Jun, President of Nanjing University

Rami Khouri, Senior Fellow of the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs

Senator Menno Knip, Chair, Sub-Committee on Transatlantic Economic Relations

Pravin Krishna, Chung Ju Yung Distinguished Professor of International Economics and Business

David M. Lampton, George and Sadie Hyman Professor and Director of China Studies, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Nicholas Lardy, Anthony M. Solomon Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics

Philippe Lazzarini, Deputy United Nations Special Coordinator for Lebanon

Roger Leeds, Senior Research Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Richard Lugar, former Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Michael Lynton, CEO Sony Entertainment, Chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment

Suzanne Maloney, Senior Fellow Center for Middle East Policy and Energy Security and Climate Initiative, The Brookings Institution

Michael Mandelbaum, Christian A. Herter Professor and Director of American Foreign Policy, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Catherine L. Mann, OECD Chief Economist

Liu Mingkang, Distinguished Research Fellow at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and Former Chairman, China Banking Regulatory Commission

Rachel Notley, Premier of Alberta

Ambassador Lana Nusseibeh, United Arab Emirates Permanent Representative to the United Nations

Evan Osnos, Staff Writer for The New Yorker

Ambassador Anne W. Patterson, Assistant Secretary of State for Near East Affairs

Richard Plepler, Chairman and CEO of HBO

Kenneth Pollack, Senior Fellow, Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

Trudy Rubin, Foreign Affairs Columnist, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Paolo Scaroni, Deputy Chairman of the Rothschild Group

Jacquelyn Serwer, Chief Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Jean-Francois Seznec, Scholar, Middle East Institute and Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Ambassador Wendy R. Sherman, former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs (2016 Commencement speaker)

Adam Sieminski, Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration

Randa Slim, Director for Track II Initiatives at the Middle East Institute and Fellow, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins SAIS

Martin Sommer, Deputy Chief, Middle East and Central Asia Regional Studies Division, International Monetary Fund

Steve Strongin, Head of Global Investment Research, Goldman Sachs

Lawrence Summers, Charles W. Eliot University Professor and President Emeritus at Harvard University

Reka Szemerkenyi, Ambassador of Hungary

Hung Tran, Executive Managing Director, Institute of International Finance

Gita Wirjawan, Chairman of Ancora Group and former Republic of Indonesia Minister of Trade

Peter Wittig, Ambassador of Germany

Shahid Yusuf, Chief Economist, International Growth Center, and Johns Hopkins SAIS Adjunct Professor

Min Zhu, Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund