January 6, 2017

Moderated by James Przystup, Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Strategic Research, National Defense University

First Panel: United States
Rust Deming, Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins SAIS
Robert Manning, Resident Senior Fellow, Atlantic Council
James Schoff, Senior Fellow, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CEIP)
Nicholas Szechenyi, Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)

Second Panel: Japan
Yuichi Hosoya, Professor, Keio University
Matake Kamiya, Professor, National Defense Academy of Japan
Yoichi Kato, Senior Research Fellow, Rebuild Japan Initiative Foundation
Akio Takahara, Professor, University of Tokyo

The Edwin O. Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies partnered with the Institute for National Security Studies at the National Defense University (NDU) and the Japan Forum on International Relations (JFIR) to host two panel discussions of Japanese and American scholars on the implications of Donald Trump’s election for the US-Japan alliance and the challenges both countries face in East Asia.

The first panel focused on the challenges facing the US-Japan security alliance. CSIS's Nicholas Szechenyi reviewed Japanese and American national security in light of regional issues such as the rise of China. Robert Manning of the Atlantic Council noted the international challenges posed by a rise in populism and shifts away from a rule-based world order. Next, Akio Takahara, and Yoichi Kato focused on the role of China in Japanese security considerations and the importance of strategic trust and threat perception respectively.

The second panel detailed future steps for the alliance. Professor Rust Deming noted how the new US administration must continue to support a strong relationship with Japan both in hard and soft power. Next, CEIP's James Schoff discussed how the new government must address the future of the alliance, especially trade. Finally, Matake Kamiya and Yuichi Hosoya talked about how Japan can play a proactive role by increasing defense spending, and engaging with regional allies.